IMPORTANCE OF LEARNING PORTFOLIO FOR PHARMACISTS

Mike Rouse, BPharm, MPS, FFIP, Assistant Executive Director, Professional Affairs and Director, International Services Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE).USA

 

A pharmacist’s learning portfolio is a dynamic tool to record and review learning and its application in practice. It helps pharmacists to plan their learning, and to track the progress in achieving their learning objectives. For the learner, identifying the context for learning is achieved through the reflection part of the portfolio. Choosing and completing educational activities (both formal and informal) with the most appropriate structure and process is achieved through planning. Assessing outcomes is achieved by evaluating what has been learned and achieved as a result of the educational activities. Impact is evaluated later once the learning has been applied in practice.

Innovative practices in CPD include a greater focus on competency-based approaches (evaluating and developing knowledge, skills, attitudes and values). This involves firstly evaluating actual performance in the practice/work setting and identifying performance gaps, then creating and implementing a personalized learning plan to develop or enhance the needed competencies (KSAV). Ideally, competency levels are assessed again, after a planned implementation time, to assure the development of the applicable competency(ies).

This presentation will address practical guidance on how to use all important components of a learning portfolio, and different models and elements of a pharmacist’s portfolio will be presented and discussed.

 

Objectives:

  • Introduce the pharmacist’s portfolio as a dynamic tool to record and review individual learning plans and achievements
  • Explore how to use reflection as a starting point for self-directed lifelong learning and development
  • Understand the role of self-assessment in reflection
  • Explain the documentation component of the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) Cycle
  • Present different models and elements of pharmacists’ learning portfolios